Two Hundred Years Together

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Two Hundred Years Together, a two-volume history of Russian-Jewish relations, initially grew out of The Red Wheel, his monumental opus on the Russian Revolution. In Two Hundred Years Together, Solzhenitsyn emphatically denies (in Chapters 9 and 14) that the Russian revolutions of 1905 and 1917 were the result of a "Jewish conspiracy" (just as he had earlier forcefully criticized the extreme nationalists who were and are obsessed with Freemasons and Jews—see, e.g., Russia in Collapse, Chapter 25, “The Maladies of Russian Nationalism”).

In The Red Wheel Solzhenitsyn had shown the Revolution in full complexity; and indeed—to avoid boiling down that complexity or skewing it via the narrow prism of Russian-Jewish relations—he gave The Red Wheel priority of publication in every major language, ahead of Two Hundred Years Together. And so likewise in English, an authorized translation of Two Hundred Years Together will follow The Red Wheel.

Two Hundred Years Together was first published in Russian in the 1990s, and several times since. The definitive Russian edition is published by Vremya (Moscow, 2015), as volumes 26 & 27 of their ongoing 30-volume collected works of Solzhenitsyn.

An authorized French translation is published in two volumes by Fayard.

An authorized German translation is published in two volumes by Herbig, and can be found here:

With respect to an English edition—to recapitulate the above—an authorized translation of the full work is firmly in the plans, but awaits the completion of English publication of The Red Wheel. Therefore, no information is yet available regarding a specific publication timeline. 

Meanwhile, readers need to be forewarned that any and all English versions available on the Internet (with two important exceptions listed below) are illegal, pirated, and/or entirely unauthorized; often poorly and loosely translated; and redact passages, and indeed whole chapters, that apparently do not support the prejudices of those behind these illegal editions.

  • Editors’ Introduction, Author’s Introduction, and excerpts from Chapters 8,9,15,16, translated by Alexis Klimoff & Stephan Solzhenitsyn, available in The Solzhenitsyn Reader.
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  • Author’s Introduction and the complete Chapter 11, translated by Jamey Gambrell, published in Common Knowledge, vol. 9, issue 2 (Spring 2003), pp. 204–27.
    - Download (pdf)


Additional RESOURCES

  • Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, first interview with Viktor Loshak, Moscow News, 20 June 2001
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  • Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, second interview with Viktor Loshak, Moscow News, 1 January 2003
    - Download (pdf)

  • Daniel J. Mahoney, "In Search of  Mutual Understanding: Solzhenitsyn on Russia’s 'Jewish Question’"
    - Download (pdf)

  • Geoffrey Hosking, Times Literary Supplement review of Russian edition, 1 March 2002
    - Download (pdf)

  • Richard Pipes, New Republic review of Russian edition, 25 November 2002
    - Download (pdf)